Futurity2 min read
Air Pollution Boosts Alzheimer’s Disease Risk
A new study has found that adults exposed to high levels of air pollution were at an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. In a study of 1,113 participants between the ages of 45-75 from the Emory Healthy Brain Study, all of whom were fro
Futurity3 min read
Chemicals In Your Garage May Boost ALS Risk
A new study finds that storing chemicals in a garage at home may be linked with an increased risk of ALS. Over the last decade, researchers at University of Michigan continue to find that exposure to environmental toxins—from pesticides used in agric
Futurity3 min read
Synthetic Platelets Stop Bleeding In Animal Models
Researchers have developed synthetic platelets that can be used to stop bleeding and enhance healing at the site of an injury. The researchers have demonstrated that the synthetic platelets work well in animal models but have not yet begun clinical t
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Team Finds New Source For Sleep-related Brain Waves
Researchers have uncovered a previously unknown source of two key brain waves crucial for deep sleep: slow waves and sleep spindles. Traditionally believed to originate from one brain circuit linking the thalamus and cortex, the team’s findings, publ
Futurity4 min read
Why Do Some People Have Arthritis Pain But No Inflammation?
New research may explain why some people with rheumatoid arthritis have pain without inflammation. Treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has come a long way in recent years. In many cases, a battery of medications can now successfully stymy the inf
Futurity2 min read
Working Odd Hours Can Take A Serious Toll On Health By Age 50
People who work irregular job schedules staring at 22 are more likely to report sleep issues, poor health, and depressive symptoms by age 50, according to a new study. With the rise of the US service economy and technological progress, researchers ar
Futurity4 min read
New Theory May Clarify ‘Mysteries’ Of Parkinson’s Disease
Researchers have a new theory about the origins and spread of Parkinson’s disease. The nose or the gut? For the past two decades, the scientific community has debated the wellspring of the toxic proteins at the source of Parkinson’s disease. In 2003,
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Seafood Waste Isn’t As Bad As Previously Thought
A new study shows seafood food loss and waste in the United States is approximately 22.7%, a drastic decrease from previous estimates of between 43% and 47%. The study, conducted in part by researchers from the University of Florida Institute of Food
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AI May Cut Mammogram False Positives Without Missing Cancer
Using artificial intelligence to supplement radiologists’ evaluations of mammograms may improve breast cancer screening by reducing false positives without missing cases of cancer, according to a new study. The researchers developed an algorithm that
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1 Ice Grain From Jupiter’s Moon May Be Enough To Find Signs Of Life
Individual ice grains ejected from some of the moons orbiting Saturn and Jupiter may contain enough material for instruments headed there in the fall to detect signs of life, if such life exists. The ice-encrusted oceans of these planetary bodies are
Futurity2 min read
Why Are Nurses Quitting Health Care?
Aside from retirements, poor working conditions are the leading reasons nurses leave health care employment, according to a new study. The findings come at a time when hospital executives cite staffing problems as their most pressing concern. “Prior
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Fish Schools Are Quieter Than One Fish Alone
Swimming in schools makes fish surprisingly stealthy underwater, with a group able to sound like a single fish, researchers report. The study offers new insight into why fish swim in schools and holds promise for the design and operation of much quie
Futurity3 min readChemistry
Method Could Interrupt Key Process In Neurodegenerative Disease
Researchers have uncovered a potential method for interrupting the misfolding of tau protein that underlies neurodegenerative disease. A spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD), progressive supranuclear palsy (
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The Right Tutoring Can Reverse Learning Loss From The Pandemic
New research results show promise for reducing the pandemic-era learning loss in students. The preliminary results from the Personalized Learning Initiative (PLI) show that in-school high-dosage tutoring can lead to large and positive effects on stud
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Ovary ‘Atlas’ Could Lead To Lab-made Ovaries
A new “atlas” of the human ovary provides insights that could lead to treatments restoring ovarian hormone production and the ability to have biologically related children, engineers report. This deeper understanding of the ovary means researchers co
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Better School Air Quality May Shield Kids With Disabilities From COVID
Good airflow and filtration in schools may help children with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their teachers avoid COVID infections, a new study finds. During the pandemic, researchers from the University of Rochester Medical Center (
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Shark Skin Inspiration Could Lead To Better Sonar Arrays
A new textured surface designed to mimic shark skin that can reduce drag and mitigate flow-based noise, potentially opens the door to a new generation of more effective and efficient towed sonar arrays. Submarines and ships rely on towed sonar arrays
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New COVID Detection Technique Is Faster And More Accurate
With new cases, hospitalizations, and mortality rates holding steady in many parts of the world, researchers have developed a faster, more accurate detection technique for COVID-19. A new study in Advanced Materials Interface describes the rapid diag
Futurity1 min read
How To Calm Your Kids’ Travel Anxiety
Families planning summer getaways may find that recent headlines about transportation-related disasters have their children feeling a bit anxious about vacation travel. Derek Seward, a professor in the counseling and Human services department at Syra
Futurity3 min read
Canada Lynx Likely Roamed The US More Than Once Thought
A broader past could mean a brighter future for Canada lynx in the US, according to new research. The study indicates that lynx might do well in the future in parts of Utah, central Idaho, and the Yellowstone National Park region, even considering cl
Futurity2 min readPopular Culture & Media Studies
Disappearing Photos Increase Dating App Matches
A new study finds that sharing photos that vanish after being seen can increase the number of matches on a dating app. Because of catfishing and other dating scams, privacy is essential on online dating sites, even more so than other places online. H
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What Dogs Teach Us About Aging
The world’s largest study of dogs is investigating questions about our four-legged friends’ aging. Every dog owner has faced the hard realization that their dog won’t live as long as they do, but we’ve all probably wondered: Why do some dogs live lon
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Team Links Children’s Microbiome With Autism, ADHD
Researchers have identified bacteria in the contents of children’s microbiomes that are believed to contribute to the development of neurodevelopmental disorders, years before the children are diagnosed. Changes to the microbiome, the community of mi
Futurity4 min read
What Can Scientists Learn From The Eclipse?
The Great North American Eclipse of 2024 will offer spectacular views and provide scientists an opportunity to study and make new discoveries about the sun, Earth, and our space environment. Alessandro Peca’s curiosity for the cosmos began when he wa
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Should You Worry About Measles Outbreaks In The US?
An infectious diseases expert has answers for you about measles symptoms, prevention, and how concerning the latest numbers are. It’s one of the most contagious viral diseases in the world—and outbreaks are popping up across the United States. More t
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Medieval People Had Surprising Ideas About Eclipses
Experts share historical insights into medieval society’s fascination with astronomical and astrological phenomena, including eclipses. In medieval and Renaissance society and culture, celestial events were not mere spectacles in the sky. Rather, the
Futurity2 min read
Window Coating Blocks Heat, Not The View
A new window coating can block heat-generating ultraviolet and infrared light while letting in visible light, regardless of the sun’s angle. Windows welcome light into interior spaces, but they also bring in unwanted heat. The new coating can be inco
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Astronomers Snap Magnetic Fields Swirling Around Black Hole
A new image from the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration has uncovered strong and organized magnetic fields spiraling from the edge of the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A*, or Sgr A*. Seen in polarized light for the first time, this new view
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France-sized Ice Shelf Moves Suddenly Once Or Twice Daily
The largest ice shelf in Antarctica lurches forward once or twice each day, researchers report. In Antarctica, heavy glaciers are always on the move. Conveyor belts of ice known as ice streams are the corridors of faster flow that carry most of the v
Futurity2 min read
A Warmer Winter May Make Your Spring Allergies Worse
An unusually warm winter may be making hay fever and other seasonal allergies worse, say experts. Emily Weis and Katherine Tuttle in Allergy, Immunology, & Rheumatology at the University of Rochester offer insight into common spring allergies and the
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