Discover millions of ebooks, audiobooks, and so much more with a free trial

Only $11.99/month after trial. Cancel anytime.

British Motorcycles of the 1960s and ’70s
Perambulators
British Campaign Medals 1815-1914
Ebook series30 titles

Shire Library Series

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

4/5

()

About this series

An illustrated historical tour of London's 13 great railway termini, on a clockwise circuit from Paddington to Victoria.

London's railway termini are among the most recognisable and familiar landmarks in the city. Famed for their bustling platforms and architectural innovation, they comprise a fascinating mixture of Neo-Gothic exuberance and purposeful modernity. Though each owes its existence to a long-extinct Victorian railway company, these stations continue to be central to London life, with millions of visitors passing through every year. This historical whistlestop tour takes you on a circuit of London's thirteen great railway termini, from Paddington, through King's Cross, to Victoria. Ranging from the earliest stations to the latest restorations and ongoing developments, this beautifully illustrated book examines both their legacy and their future.
LanguageEnglish
Release dateNov 22, 2011
British Motorcycles of the 1960s and ’70s
Perambulators
British Campaign Medals 1815-1914

Titles in the series (100)

  • British Campaign Medals 1815-1914

    384

    British Campaign Medals 1815-1914
    British Campaign Medals 1815-1914

    At a time of imperial expansion, British forces were almost constantly in action against major powers, in wars of conquest, or in expeditions on the fringes of Empire, such as the North West Frontier, southern Africa or Burma. This book outlines the medals issued to British soldiers and sailors for military service.

  • British Motorcycles of the 1960s and ’70s

    654

    British Motorcycles of the 1960s and ’70s
    British Motorcycles of the 1960s and ’70s

    For the first half of the 20th century Great Britain led the world in motorcycle design and production, exporting its products to countries in every section of the globe. However, as the second half of the century began in 1960 this once great industry commenced what was to be a terminal decline. During the 1960s and '70s Britain still manufactured a wide range of machines, but a combination of poor management, lack of investment, foreign competition (notably from Japan), and the arrival of the small, affordable car transpired to effectively sound the death knell of the British motorcycle by the end of the 1970s.

  • Perambulators

    472

    Perambulators
    Perambulators

    A complete illustrated history of the British wheeled baby carrier, from the eighteenth century to the end of the classic pram era, this book is a nostalgic trip down memory lane, and an invaluable resource for any owner or collector of historic prams. Examining and illustrating the design and development of full-size prams, this book details the technological changes that affected pram design, and the rise in popularity of the pram. In an intriguing final section the author goes on to examine the designs of children's toy prams, which were perfect miniature versions of the full-sized prams. These miniature prams kept pace with the design changes of the full-sized prams, and this section will be especially interesting for toy collectors.

  • Clarice Cliff

    590

    Clarice Cliff
    Clarice Cliff

    There are few pieces of pottery more recognisable than those designed by Clarice Cliff. For many the epitome of Art Deco, characterised by bold colour and lines, geometric shapes, and stylised representations of the countryside, Clarice Cliff's 'bizarre' pottery is collected all over the world. Using a wealth of colour illustrations, Will Farmer traces the story of Clarice Cliff and the pottery that she created. Employed in The Potteries from the age of thirteen, Clarice was talented and resourceful, and in 1927 she was given her own studio at the Newport Pottery where, for the next twelve years, she produced a range of sought-after designs that have become icons of the age.

  • The 1960s Home

    604

    The 1960s Home
    The 1960s Home

    The 1960s witnessed a sustained period of economic growth, consumer spending and stable employment. This hitherto unknown prosperity enabled a market growth in levels of owner occupation and a subsequent boom in the sale of household furnishings and luxury goods. The 1960s Home looks at the styles and fashions in domestic housing and interiors between 1960 and 1970. Although this period has received increasing attention in recent years, much of it has been concentrated on progressive and exclusive design rather than on the furniture and furnishing of the 'average' home.

  • Buckles

    477

    Buckles
    Buckles

    The humble buckle is an often-taken for granted fastening, yet its usefulness and sturdiness has ensured that it has survived from ancient times through to the present day. The author provides a comprehensive typology of buckles, from the earliest designs to the most recent uses. With detailed records of the types of buckles from different historical periods and listings of museums where they can be found, this book offers the re-enactor essential guidance for period costumes, and provides the collector or enthusiast with the information needed to continue or begin to learning about this enduring and practical object.

  • London Plaques

    568

    London Plaques
    London Plaques

    London's buildings are dotted with commemorative plaques. Many are the famous blue plaques, indicating where a famous person was born, lived, stayed, or if a significant event took place there, or an earlier use of the site. This book is a comprehensive gazetteer of all of London's plaques. Using Derek Sumeray's classic book as a basis, this thoroughly revised new edition arranges plaques alphabetically by area, providing a text that is linked to London's geography and, therefore, of greater use to a resident or visitor wanting to explore the famous people and events commemorated in that area.

  • Church Misericords and Bench Ends

    230

    Church Misericords and Bench Ends
    Church Misericords and Bench Ends

    With the increasing disappearance of stained glass in medieval churches, the surviving wood carvings on church misericords and bench ends are extremely important in providing an insight into the medieval mind. The carved images were often used to convey the messages of the Christian faith in the Middle Ages but they were not just concerned with religion and religious symbols – they also told stories of mythology, humour and satire, showing illustrations of everyday life and people. This book outlines the history of church seating and discusses the craftsmen and the influences behind their work. Using illustrations, the author then explains the subject matter of these wood carvings, revealing how one can discover so much about medieval life – the spiritualism, moralism and the wit – within the carvings still found in churches today.

  • The Victorians and Edwardians at Work

    549

    The Victorians and Edwardians at Work
    The Victorians and Edwardians at Work

    A picture can say a thousand words and the images caught on camera during the Victorian and Edwardian periods provide a fascinating insight into the lives of Britons during this time. Take a step back between 1840 and 1910 and explore the world of work and working conditions experienced by the Victorians and Edwardians through the rich variety of photographs and vintage postcards in this beautiful album. A world we usually see in monochrome or sepia, is presented here in vivid colour, bringing the Victorian and Edwardian people a little closer to us. 128 pages are packed with images of shipyards, factories, bakeries, and life in the forces. We see the men and women who made cutlery in Sheffield, the women who gutted and packed the herring in the east coast fishing ports, and the women who worked the coal screens in Lancashire's many collieries, as well as some 'tongue in cheek' Victorian images of domestic life, visiting the dentist, and many other themes and subjects, all of which tell the story of working life 100 to 160 years ago. Go on, take a look!

  • The Victorians and Edwardians at Play

    550

    The Victorians and Edwardians at Play
    The Victorians and Edwardians at Play

    A picture can say a thousand words and the images caught on camera during the Victorian and Edwardian periods provide a fascinating insight into the lives of Britons during this time. Take a step back between 1840 and 1910 and explore the pastimes, hobbies, sports and other entertainments enjoyed by the Victorians and Edwardians through the rich variety of photographs and vintage postcards in this beautiful album. A world we usually see in monochrome or sepia is presented here in vivid colour, bringing the Victorian and Edwardian people a little closer to us. 128 pages are packed with images of people on the golf course, playing croquet and tennis, sports days and football matches. We see visits to the zoo, cruises on river boats and paddle steamers, fairground and pleasure beach excursions, days at the races and other, more unusual pursuits, all of which tell the story of social life 100 to 160 years ago. Go on, take a look!

  • Railway Posters

    658

    Railway Posters
    Railway Posters

    Railway posters have huge appeal for the modern audience, but just what explains this continuing interest? Enduring images of iconic locomotives, bathing beauties and characters such as Sunny South Sam are testament to the creativity of the railway company marketing departments and the posters tell us not only about railway history and technology, architectural and engineering accomplishments, but also about the cultural and social significance of the railways. The influence of the railway industry on our cities and coastlines, and on the development of leisure time and holiday resorts, can be seen in the recurring images of ramblers, bathers and idyllic tourist destinations. This book explores the changing styles and functions of the railway poster from the early pre-grouping days through to the inter-war 'golden age' and nationalised British Railways.

  • Britain's Working Coast in Victorian and Edwardian Times

    548

    Britain's Working Coast in Victorian and Edwardian Times
    Britain's Working Coast in Victorian and Edwardian Times

    The coastline of Victorian and Edwardian Britain provided beauty, entertainment and the venue for most people's holidays. But it was also a thriving centre of industry shipbuilding and fishing, plus the numerous trades associated with dockyards, coastal transport and the leisure industry. This book travels around Britain's coast clockwise from London looking at the industries that could be found at many of the cities and towns en route. Illustrated with an amazing collection of coloured postcards and other early photographs, the working coast of Britain is brought to life in all its bustling detail.

  • Fashion in the Time of Jane Austen

    583

    Fashion in the Time of Jane Austen
    Fashion in the Time of Jane Austen

    The broader Regency period 1795 to 1820, stands alone as an incredible moment in fashion history, unlike anything that went before it. For the first time England became a fashion influence, especially for menswear, and became the toast of Paris, as court dress became secondary to the season-by-season flux of fashion as we know it today. Sarah Jane Downing explores the fashion revolution and the innovation that inspired a flood of fashions taking influence from far afield. It was an era of contradiction immortalised by Jane Austen, who adeptly used the new-found diversity of fashion to enliven her characters: Wickham's military splendour; Mr Darcy's understated elegance; and Miss Tilney's romantic fixation with white muslin.

  • Buttons

    382

    Buttons
    Buttons

    Buttons have been made from almost every known material. Their study provides insight into fashion trends, the clothing industry and social history in general. This book introduces an array of these treasures from the past, to show the variety of materials and the intricate design and workmanship incorporated in the making of the button.

  • VW Camper and Microbus

    486

    VW Camper and Microbus
    VW Camper and Microbus

    The Volkswagen Transporter is one of the best-loved and most recognisable motor vehicles of all time. The preferred transport for surfers and hippies everywhere, the Volkswagen Type 2 'bus' was born in 1950, and became the first of a new breed of vehicle, the ancestor of today's people carrier. Available in various versions, including panel van, pick up and minibus, Transporters were often converted into campervans for a newly motorised class of holidaymaker. This book looks at the development, production and use of the class first, and second, generation Transporter. With archive illustrations including many colour photographs from old brochures this book is also a great evocation of the 1950s and 60s.

  • British Campaign Medals of the First World War

    636

    British Campaign Medals of the First World War
    British Campaign Medals of the First World War

    Britain has issued medals rewarding war service since at least the early nineteenth century, and increasingly through the period of its imperial expansion prior to 1914, but examples of many of the early types are now scarce. However, few families escaped some involvement with “the Great War” of 1914 18, and many still treasure the medals awarded to their ancestors for wartime service. Today, with a growing interest in British military history and particularly in family history and genealogy, more and more people want to trace their ancestors' past. This book looks in detail at the origin, types and varieties of the British medals awarded for general war service between 1914 and '18, and gives advice on researching the awards and their recipients.

  • British Gallantry Awards 1855-2000

    394

    British Gallantry Awards 1855-2000
    British Gallantry Awards 1855-2000

    British Gallantry Awards 1855-2000. This book surveys the British decorations and medals from the origins in the Crimean War of 1854-6 up to the end of the twentieth century.

  • The English Seaside in Victorian and Edwardian Times

    547

    The English Seaside in Victorian and Edwardian Times
    The English Seaside in Victorian and Edwardian Times

    Through a collection of coloured holiday photographs covering all the major and several minor resorts around England's coast, linked to selected written commentaries from Charles Dickens and many others, this book celebrates the heyday of the seaside holiday.

  • Chocolate: The British Chocolate Industry

    497

    Chocolate: The British Chocolate Industry
    Chocolate: The British Chocolate Industry

    Kit Kat, Turkish Delight, Creme Egg, Rolo and All Gold: they are all as much a part of British life as were the companies that made them and which led the chocolate revolution in the nineteenth century: Rowntree's, Fry's, Cadbury's, Mackintosh and Terry's. This book charts the history of chocolate manufacture, marketing and consumption in Britain from its origins in the eighteenth century. It then describes the golden age from 1900 to the 1970s and the subsequent US and Swiss invasions, spearheaded by brands such as Mars, Toblerone and Nestlé's Milky Bar, including the takeovers by Nestle and Kraft.

  • Peat and Peat Cutting

    483

    Peat and Peat Cutting
    Peat and Peat Cutting

    For thousands of years peat was the main fuel that that warmed houses all over the British Isles, and the mark of the peat cutter is written deep in the landscape. This book is a celebration of a cultural history that extended from the Iron Age to the twentieth century. It tells the story of the use of peat for fuel in the British Isles, and the people who cut it. It also examines the methods of cutting, the tools that were used, and the organization of cutting. It chronicles the beginning of commercial extraction and the exhaustion of this precious resource.

  • Meccano

    653

    Meccano
    Meccano

    It has now been over a century since Frank Hornby invented a toy to amuse his sons and called it Meccano, coining a word which has entered the dictionary as a term in common usage and is now known all over the world. Hornby's vision of an educational toy became the basis of perhaps the most successful British toy business of the twentieth century. Meccano has amused generations of children, encouraging many to become successful engineers. Roger Marriott here explores the long history of Meccano, charting the development of the various sets and components, which for decades have been interchangeable, and explains the endless fascination of this iconic construction toy.

  • Scalextric

    572

    Scalextric
    Scalextric

    Scalextric, the ultimate boys' toy, arrived in toyshops in 1957. The first-ever electric slot-car system, with uncontrollable tinplate cars running on heavy rubber track, it brought the speed and glamour of motor racing to suburban living rooms. Classic marques of the day such as Aston Martin, Jaguar and Lotus featured in the early '60s scalextric sets, and over the years that followed all the classic Formula 1 battles were re-created in schoolboy form, followed by sports cars, rally cars, and classic film re-creations such as the James Bond set of 1968, Batman and Knight Rider.

  • British Campaign Medals 1914-2005

    393

    British Campaign Medals 1914-2005
    British Campaign Medals 1914-2005

    Surveys the medals awarded to British personnel for military services from the First World War to operations of British forces in the opening years of the twenty-first century. The campaign medals awarded for the military actions have become a popular field for collectors, since the majority of British awards were officially named.

  • Airfix Kits

    598

    Airfix Kits
    Airfix Kits

    With the aid of stringy glue and scalpel-sliced fingers, young and old have turned display cabinets and bedrooms into mini-museums, or tiny battlefields. This book looks at the fascinating tale of this British company a pioneer in the world of modelling as well as its products, its changing fortunes over the years, and its links with popular culture. Using colour images, Trevor Pask explores this thriving pastime, allowing Airfix kit lovers to indulge in a nostalgic journey and those new to the hobby an intriguing insight into its history.

  • Tractors: 1880s to 1980s

    577

    Tractors: 1880s to 1980s
    Tractors: 1880s to 1980s

    Steam, and then cumbersome motor, tractors existed in small numbers before 1914, after which the need to produce more foods using less horse and man power saw the origins of the machine we know today. Thanks to mass production, Ford brought the price down to suit average farmers, and in the 1920s to 1940s numerous rivals brought in such novelties as diesel engines, pneumatic tyres, hydraulic implement lifts and even cost-effective all-wheel drive and weather protection. After the Second World-War, a strong new indigenous tractor industry was led by Ferguson, David Brown, Nuffield and Ford. This book highlights these developments and goes on to show the dramatic improvements of the 1950s and 1960s.

  • Farming in the 1920s and 30s

    666

    Farming in the 1920s and 30s
    Farming in the 1920s and 30s

    With world markets upset and economies in recession, the 1920s and '30s were not an easy time for farmers, who required great resilience to survive. Jonathan Brown here examines the challenges that farmers faced and the ways in which they responded. Some turned to new crops, with new markets emerging for sugar beet, eggs, milk and pork. Some used tractors and other machines to increase productivity, and the motor car and lorry opened up new possibilities for bringing produce to market. It was hard work whichever direction was taken, but the effects of these innovations was undeniably beneficial and the farming landscape was transformed from what it had been in Victorian and Edwardian times.

  • The Flying Scotsman: The Train, The Locomotive, The Legend

    586

    The Flying Scotsman: The Train, The Locomotive, The Legend
    The Flying Scotsman: The Train, The Locomotive, The Legend

    The Flying Scotsman is probably the most famous railway locomotive in the world. It first caused a sensation for its beauty and its speed in 1923, and it soon became a national icon. The fastest and most comfortable way of travelling between London and Scotland, The Flying Scotsman only got faster and more luxurious as competition from other routes, airlines, and the motor car threatened. From 1928 it began running non-stop, an achievement that earned it yet more attention. This superbly illustrated book celebrates the much-loved locomotive, the train that shared its name, the route it took, and how it captured the imagination of the nation.

  • Shepherds and Shepherding

    732

    Shepherds and Shepherding
    Shepherds and Shepherding

    The old-time shepherd – lamb in one hand, crook in the other – is an emblem of sturdiness, dependability and independence. He was one of the most important men on the farm, responsible for the care and well-being of the flock, with which he might need to spend days and nights out in open pastures. How did he manage his charges and his own life? What skills and equipment did he use? How did sheep farming change in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and what effect did those changes have on the shepherd's work? These are some of the questions considered by this fully illustrated exploration of shepherding life.

  • London’s Statues and Monuments

    599

    London’s Statues and Monuments
    London’s Statues and Monuments