Discover millions of ebooks, audiobooks, and so much more with a free trial

Only $11.99/month after trial. Cancel anytime.

Imperial medicine and indigenous societies
Emigrants and empire: British settlement in the dominions between the wars
Policing the empire: Government, authority and control, 1830-1940
Ebook series30 titles

Studies in Imperialism Series

Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

()

About this series

This book offers the first comprehensive history of white workers from the end of the First World War to Zimbabwean independence in 1980. It reveals how white worker identity was constituted, examines the white labouring class as an ethnically and nationally heterogeneous formation comprised of both men and women, and emphasises the active participation of white workers in the ongoing and contested production of race. White wage labourers' experiences, both as exploited workers and as part of the privileged white minority, offer insight into how race and class co-produced one another and how boundaries fundamental to settler colonialism were regulated and policed. Based on original research conducted in Zimbabwe, South Africa and the UK, this book offers a unique theoretical synthesis of work on gender, whiteness studies, labour histories, settler colonialism, Marxism, emotions and the New African Economic History.
LanguageEnglish
Release dateJun 15, 2021
Imperial medicine and indigenous societies
Emigrants and empire: British settlement in the dominions between the wars
Policing the empire: Government, authority and control, 1830-1940

Titles in the series (94)

  • Policing the empire: Government, authority and control, 1830-1940

    18

    Policing the empire: Government, authority and control, 1830-1940
    Policing the empire: Government, authority and control, 1830-1940

  • Imperial medicine and indigenous societies

    6

    Imperial medicine and indigenous societies
    Imperial medicine and indigenous societies

  • Emigrants and empire: British settlement in the dominions between the wars

    14

    Emigrants and empire: British settlement in the dominions between the wars
    Emigrants and empire: British settlement in the dominions between the wars

  • The other empire: Metropolis, India and progress in the colonial imagination

    50

    The other empire: Metropolis, India and progress in the colonial imagination
    The other empire: Metropolis, India and progress in the colonial imagination

    This electronic version has been made available under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) open access license. This is a detailed study of the various ways in which London and India were imaginatively constructed by British observers during the nineteenth century. This process took place within a unified field of knowledge that brought together travel and evangelical accounts to exert a formative influence on the creation of London and India for the domestic reading public. Their distinct narratives, rhetoric and chronologies forged homologies between representations of the metropolitan poor and colonial subjects – those constituencies that were seen as the most threatening to imperial progress. Thus the poor and particular sections of the Indian population were inscribed within discourses of western civilization as regressive and inferior peoples. Over time these discourses increasingly promoted notions of overt and rigid racial hierarchies, of which a legacy still remains. Drawing upon cultural and intellectual history this comparative study seeks to rethink the location of the poor and India within the nineteenth-century imagination.

  • Colonial masculinity: The 'manly Englishman' and the 'effeminate Bengali' in the late nineteenth century

    24

    Colonial masculinity: The 'manly Englishman' and the 'effeminate Bengali' in the late nineteenth century
    Colonial masculinity: The 'manly Englishman' and the 'effeminate Bengali' in the late nineteenth century

    Colonial masculinity breaks new ground by placing masculinity at the centre of colonial and nationalist politics in late nineteenth century India. Mrinalini Sinha situates the analysis very specifically in the context of an imperial social formation, examining colonial masculinity not only in the context of social forces within India but also as framed by and framing political, economic and ideological shifts in Britain.

  • Female imperialism and national identity: Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire

    45

    Female imperialism and national identity: Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire
    Female imperialism and national identity: Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire

    This electronic version has been made available under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) open access license. Through a study of the British Empire’s largest women’s patriotic organisation, formed in 1900, and still in existence, this book examines the relationship between female imperialism and national identity. It throws new light on women’s involvement in imperialism; on the history of ‘conservative’ women’s organisations; on women’s interventions in debates concerning citizenship and national identity; and on the history of women in white settler societies. After placing the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) in the context of recent scholarly work in Canadian, gender, imperial history and post-colonial theory, the book follows the IODE’s history through the twentieth century. Tracing the organisation into the postcolonial era, where previous imperial ideas are outmoded, it considers the transformation from patriotism to charity, and the turn to colonisation at home in the Canadian North.

  • Policing and decolonisation

    20

    Policing and decolonisation
    Policing and decolonisation

  • West Indian intellectuals in Britain

    49

    West Indian intellectuals in Britain
    West Indian intellectuals in Britain

    This electronic version has been made available under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) open access license. The first comprehensive discussion of the major Caribbean thinkers who came to Britain. Written in an accessible, lively style, with a range of wonderful and distinguished authors. Key book for thinking about the future of multicultural Britain; study thus far has concentrated on Caribbean literature and how authors ‘write back’ to Britain – this book is the first to consider how they ‘think back’ to Britain. A book of the moment - nothing comparable on the Carribean influence on Britain.. Discusses the influence, amongst others, of C. L. R. James, Una Marson, George Lamming, Jean Rhys, Claude McKay and V. S. Naipaul.

  • Race and empire: Eugenics in colonial Kenya

    107

    Race and empire: Eugenics in colonial Kenya
    Race and empire: Eugenics in colonial Kenya

    Race and empire tells the story of a short-lived but vehement eugenics movement that emerged among a group of Europeans in Kenya in the 1930s, unleashing a set of writings on racial differences in intelligence more extreme than that emanating from any other British colony in the twentieth century. The Kenyan eugenics movement of the 1930s adapted British ideas to the colonial environment: in all its extremity, Kenyan eugenics was not simply a bizarre and embarrassing colonial mutation, as it was later dismissed, but a logical extension of British eugenics in a colonial context. By tracing the history of eugenic thought in Kenya, the book shows how the movement took on a distinctive colonial character, driven by settler political preoccupations and reacting to increasingly outspoken African demands for better, and more independent, education. Through a close examination of attitudes towards race and intelligence in a British colony, Race and empire reveals how eugenics was central to colonial racial theories before World War Two.

  • Human capital and empire: Scotland, Ireland, Wales and British imperialism in Asia, <i>c.</i>1690–<i>c.</i>1820

    12

    Human capital and empire: Scotland, Ireland, Wales and British imperialism in Asia, <i>c.</i>1690–<i>c.</i>1820
    Human capital and empire: Scotland, Ireland, Wales and British imperialism in Asia, <i>c.</i>1690–<i>c.</i>1820

    Human capital and empire compares the role of Scots, Irish and Welsh within the English East India Company between c. 1690 and c. 1820. It focuses on why the three groups developed such distinctive and different profiles within the corporation and its wider colonial activities in Asia. Besides contributing to the national histories of Scotland, Ireland and Wales, it uses these societies to ask how ‘poorer’ regions of Europe participated in global empire. The chapters cover involvement in the Company’s administrative, military, medical, maritime and private trade activities. The analysis conceives of sojourning to Asia as a cycle of human capital, with human mobility used to access a key sector of world trade. As well as providing essential new statistical information on Irish, Scottish and Welsh participation, it makes a significant contribution to ongoing debates on the legacies of empire.

  • Western medicine as contested knowledge

    27

    Western medicine as contested knowledge
    Western medicine as contested knowledge

  • Heroic imperialists in Africa: The promotion of British and French colonial heroes, 1870–1939

    106

    Heroic imperialists in Africa: The promotion of British and French colonial heroes, 1870–1939
    Heroic imperialists in Africa: The promotion of British and French colonial heroes, 1870–1939

    From the height of ‘New Imperialism’ until the Second World War, three generations of heroes of the British and French empires in Africa were selected, manufactured and packaged for consumption by a metropolitan public eager to discover new horizons and to find comfort in the concept of a ‘civilising mission’. This book looks at imperial heroism by examining the legends of a dozen major colonial figures on both sides of the Channel, revisiting the familiar stories of Livingstone, Gordon and Kitchener from a radically new angle, and throwing light on their French counterparts, often less famous in the Anglophone world but certainly equally fascinating.

  • The Victorian soldier in Africa

    53

    The Victorian soldier in Africa
    The Victorian soldier in Africa

    This electronic version has been made available under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) open access license. The Victorian soldier in Africa re-examines the campaign experience of British soldiers in Africa during the period, 1874–1902 – the zenith of the Victorian imperial expansion – and does so from the perspective of the regimental soldier. The book utilises an unprecedented number of letters and diaries, written by regimental officers and other ranks, to allow soldiers to speak for themselves about their experience of colonial warfare. The sources demonstrate the adaptability of the British army in fighting in different climates, over demanding terrain and against a diverse array of enemies. They also uncover soldiers’ responses to army reforms of the era as well as the response to the introduction of new technologies of war. Moreover, the book provides commentary on soldiers’ views of commanding officers and politicians alongside assessment of war correspondents, colonial auxiliaries and African natives in their roles as bearers, allies and enemies. This book reveals new insights on imperial and racial attitudes within the army, on relations between soldiers and the media and the production of information and knowledge from frontline to homefront. It will make fascinating reading for students, academics and enthusiasts in imperial history, Victorian studies, military history and colonial warfare.

  • Revolution and empire: English politics and American colonies in the seventeenth century

    13

    Revolution and empire: English politics and American colonies in the seventeenth century
    Revolution and empire: English politics and American colonies in the seventeenth century

  • The imperial Commonwealth: Australia and the project of empire, 1867-1914

    202

    The imperial Commonwealth: Australia and the project of empire, 1867-1914
    The imperial Commonwealth: Australia and the project of empire, 1867-1914

    From the late 1800s to the early 1900s, Australian settler colonists mobilised their unique settler experiences to develop their own vision of what ‘empire’ was and could be. Reinterpreting their histories and attempting to divine their futures with a much heavier concentration on racialized visions of humanity, white Australian settlers came to believe that their whiteness as well as their Britishness qualified them for an equal voice in the running of Britain’s imperial project. Through asserting their case, many soon claimed that, as newly minted citizens of a progressive and exemplary Australian Commonwealth, white settlers such as themselves were actually better suited to the modern task of empire. Such a settler political cosmology with empire at its center ultimately led Australians to claim an empire of their own in the Pacific Islands, complete with its own, unique imperial governmentality.

  • The Scots in South Africa: Ethnicity, identity, gender and race, 1772–1914

    68

    The Scots in South Africa: Ethnicity, identity, gender and race, 1772–1914
    The Scots in South Africa: Ethnicity, identity, gender and race, 1772–1914

    The description of South Africa as a 'rainbow nation' has always been taken to embrace the black, brown and white peoples who constitute its population. But each of these groups can be sub-divided and in the white case, the Scots have made one of the most distinctive contributions to the country's history. Now available in paperback, this book is a full-length study of their role from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries. It highlights the interaction of Scots with African peoples, the manner in which missions and schools were credited with producing 'Black Scotsmen' and the ways in which they pursued many distinctive policies. It also deals with the inter-weaving of issues of gender, class and race as well as with the means by which Scots clung to their ethnicity through founding various social and cultural societies. This book offers a major contribution to both Scottish and South African history and in the process illuminates a significant field of the Scottish Diaspora that has so far received little attention.

  • Empire, migration and identity in the British World

    104

    Empire, migration and identity in the British World
    Empire, migration and identity in the British World

    The essays in this volume have been written by leading experts in their respective fields and bring together established scholars with a new generation of migration and transnational historians. Their work weaves together the ‘new’ imperial and the ‘new’ migration histories, and is essential reading for scholars and students interested in the interplay of migration within and between the local, regional, imperial, and transnational arenas. Furthermore, these essays set an important analytical benchmark for more integrated and comparative analyses of the range of migratory processes – free and coerced – which together impacted on the dynamics of power, forms of cultural circulation and making of ethnicities across a British imperial world.

  • Britannia's children: Reading colonialism through children's books and magazines

    26

    Britannia's children: Reading colonialism through children's books and magazines
    Britannia's children: Reading colonialism through children's books and magazines

    Britannia's children looks at the roots of society's perception of racial difference through the establishment and diffusion of the image of imperial peoples in the period before and after the First World War. Focusing on materials produced for children, by textbook historians and the popular press, it provides an important study of both the socialisation of the young and the source of race perceptions in twentieth-century British society. Britannia's children introduces the reader to the imperial images of the Indian, African and Chinese - created for the youth of Britain through their history textbooks and popular periodicals. By close study of the characterisation of the 'other', shaped in this era, one can see how the young learned both the lessons of imperial allegiance and a perception of racial difference which would influence many generations to follow. This revealing book shows how society secures the rising generation in the beliefs of the parent society, and how the myths of race and nationality became an integral part of Britain's own process of self-identification. Written for historians, educators and a wider audience with an interest in the issues of race and society, this book makes important reading for those who wish to understand both the popularisation of the imperial idea and the legacy of its workings in contemporary society.

  • Acts of supremacy

    17

    Acts of supremacy
    Acts of supremacy

  • Hong Kong and British culture, 1945–97

    133

    Hong Kong and British culture, 1945–97
    Hong Kong and British culture, 1945–97

    This book examines the British cultural engagement with Hong Kong in the second half of the twentieth century. It shows how the territory fit unusually within Britain’s decolonisation narratives and served as an occasional foil for examining Britain’s own culture during a period of perceived stagnation and decline. Drawing on a wide range of archival and published primary sources, Hong Kong and British culture, 1945–97 investigates such themes as Hong Kong as a site of unrestrained capitalism, modernisation, and good government, as well as an arena of male social and sexual opportunity. It also examines the ways in which Hong Kong Chinese embraced British culture, and the competing predictions that British observers made concerning the colony’s return to Chinese sovereignty. An epilogue considers the enduring legacy of British colonialism. This book will be essential reading for historians of Hong Kong, British decolonisation, and Britain’s culture of declinism.

  • Developing Africa: Concepts and practices in twentieth-century colonialism

    115

    Developing Africa: Concepts and practices in twentieth-century colonialism
    Developing Africa: Concepts and practices in twentieth-century colonialism

    This book investigates development in British, French and Portuguese colonial Africa during the last decades of colonial rule. During this period, development became the central concept underpinning the relationship between metropolitan Europe and colonial Africa. Combining historiographical accounts with analyses from other academic viewpoints, this book investigates a range of contexts, from agriculture to mass media. With its focus on the conceptual side of development and its broad geographical scope, it offers new and unique perspectives. An extensive introduction contextualises the individual chapters and makes the book an up-to-date point of entry into the subject of colonial development, not only for a specialist readership, but also for students of history, development and postcolonial studies. Written by scholars from Africa, Europe and North America, Developing Africa is a uniquely international dialogue on this vital chapter of twentieth-century transnational history.

  • Writing imperial histories

    109

    Writing imperial histories
    Writing imperial histories

    This book appraises the critical contribution of the Studies in Imperialism series to the writing of imperial histories as the series passes its 100th publication. The volume brings together some of the most distinguished scholars writing today to explore the major intellectual trends in Imperial history, with a particular focus on the cultural readings of empire that have flourished over the last generation. When the Studies in Imperialism series was founded, the discipline of Imperial history was at what was probably its lowest ebb. A quarter of a century on, there has been a tremendous broadening of the scope of what the study of empire encompasses. Essays in the volume consider ways in which the series and the wider historiography have sought to reconnect British and imperial histories; to lay bare the cultural expressions and registers of colonial power; and to explore the variety of experiences the home population derived from the empire.

  • Empire of scholars: Universities, networks and the British academic world, 1850–1939

    103

    Empire of scholars: Universities, networks and the British academic world, 1850–1939
    Empire of scholars: Universities, networks and the British academic world, 1850–1939

    At the start of the twenty-first century we are acutely conscious that universities operate within an entangled world of international scholarly connection. Now available in paperback, Empire of scholars examines the networks that linked academics across the colonial world in the age of ‘Victorian’ globalization. Stretching across the globe, these networks helped map the boundaries of an expansive but exclusionary ‘British academic world’ that extended beyond the borders of the British Isles. Drawing on extensive archival research conducted in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, this book remaps the intellectual geographies of Britain and its empire. In doing so, it provides a new context for writing the history of ideas and offers a critical analysis of the connections that helped fashion the global world of universities today.

  • Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911

    137

    Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
    Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911

    This electronic version has been made available under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) open access license. This study examines the ritual space of nineteenth-century royal tours of empire and the diverse array of historical actors who participated in them. It suggests that the varied responses to the royal tours of the nineteenth century demonstrate how a multi-centred British imperial culture was forged in the empire and was constantly made and remade, appropriated and contested. In this context, subjects of empire provincialised the British Isles, centring the colonies in their political and cultural constructions of empire, Britishness, citizenship and loyalty.

  • Missionary families: Race, gender and generation on the spiritual frontier

    108

    Missionary families: Race, gender and generation on the spiritual frontier
    Missionary families: Race, gender and generation on the spiritual frontier

    Missionary families were an integral component of the missionary enterprise, both as active agents on the global religious stage and as a force within the enterprise that shaped understandings and theories of mission itself. Taking the family as a legitimate unit of historical analysis in its own right for the first time, Missionary families traces changing familial policies and lived realities throughout the nineteenth century and powerfully argues for the importance of an historical understanding of the missionary enterprise informed by the complex interplay between the intimate, the personal and the professional. By looking at marriage, parenting and childhood; professionalism, vocation and domesticity; race, gender and generation, this first in-depth study of missionary families reveals their profound importance to the missionary enterprise, and concludes that mission history can no longer be written without attention to the personal, emotional and intimate aspects of missionary lives.