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"Those Who Call Themselves Jews": The Church and Judaism in the Apocalypse of John
The Holy Spirit and the Renewal of All Things: Pneumatology in Paul and Jurgen Moltmann
The Subjective Eye: Essays in Culture, Religion, and Gender in Honor of Margaret R. Miles
Ebook series30 titles

Princeton Theological Monograph Series

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About this series

The doctrine of glorification is a biblical teaching that has been neglected within the Protestant church and, therefore, underdeveloped in our day. For whatever reason that may be, glorification is a doctrine that will affect every aspect of one's overarching theology, especially the doctrine of soteriology. What one ultimately believes about the future will significantly impact their present. This book shows that this neglect or lack of development has not always been the case within the church, especially within Reformed Protestantism. Looking at one of the most influential second-generation reformers and theologians of the English Reformation, William Perkins (1558-1602), it becomes evident that embedded within the Reformed Scholastic tradition lays a robust development and understanding of the doctrine of glorification. Perkins formulated and wrote a great deal on the final state of the believer in Christ, what his rewards are in Christ, and, ultimately, his complete and final transformation and conformity into his image. This book is a historical and systematic treatment of William Perkins's celebrated hope, eschatological glory.
LanguageEnglish
Release dateJan 1, 1989
"Those Who Call Themselves Jews": The Church and Judaism in the Apocalypse of John
The Holy Spirit and the Renewal of All Things: Pneumatology in Paul and Jurgen Moltmann
The Subjective Eye: Essays in Culture, Religion, and Gender in Honor of Margaret R. Miles

Titles in the series (100)

  • The Subjective Eye: Essays in Culture, Religion, and Gender in Honor of Margaret R. Miles

    59

    The Subjective Eye: Essays in Culture, Religion, and Gender in Honor of Margaret R. Miles
    The Subjective Eye: Essays in Culture, Religion, and Gender in Honor of Margaret R. Miles

    "One of the great joys of the academic life is to pay homage in a Festschrift to a scholar who has influenced both colleagues and students over years of interaction and friendship both professional and personal. This volume honors a scholar and theologian of historical theology, a theorist and a practitioner of religion and the arts, and a keen analyst of cultural trends both ancient and modern. . . . "[Margaret R.] Miles's prodigious production as a scholar has legendary qualities. Her dozen-plus books alone explore history, patristics, ancient philosophy, art and art history, spiritual formation and religious practice, critical theory, film, ethics and values, personal growth, gender and women's studies, as well as her true academic loves, Augustine and Plotinus. . . . The breadth and depth of her own work and her influence upon others demands an expansive volume, which the editors of this Festschrift unfortunately had to restrict to four categories--Historical Theology, Religion and Culture, Religion and Gender, and Religion and the Visual Arts--in order to capture the heart of our appreciation for her." --from the Introduction

  • "Those Who Call Themselves Jews": The Church and Judaism in the Apocalypse of John

    60

    "Those Who Call Themselves Jews": The Church and Judaism in the Apocalypse of John
    "Those Who Call Themselves Jews": The Church and Judaism in the Apocalypse of John

    The nature of Jewish-Christian relations at the end of the first century has been a subject of serious study and considerable debate. The time between 70 and 150 CE is held to be a volatile time in that Jewish-Christian relations were quickly, although not uniformly, deteriorating. This is a time referred to as the "partings of the ways," when the church was emerging as a religion apart from Judaism. Although it has often been neglected in this study, of particular interest is the Apocalypse of John, since it was written in this dark and turbulent time in Jewish-Christian relations. John, who is a Jewish Christian, is writing to what are likely predominantly Gentile churches. At first, he appears to deny the very name "Jew" to his ethnic kin while accusing them of belonging to Satan (2:9; 3:9). Nevertheless, he does not abandon his own Jewish background and theology. He makes broad use of the Hebrew Scriptures and Jewish cultic imagery while maintaining a Christian understanding that Jesus is the fulfillment of God's redemptive plan. What is of particular interest is how he adopts and adapts this imagery and language and applies it to the church. It is John's mix of Jewish imagery with a Christian message that may provide some insight into his perspective on the relationship between these two increasingly polarized sects. What exactly this perspective is constitutes the subject of the present discussion.

  • The Holy Spirit and the Renewal of All Things: Pneumatology in Paul and Jurgen Moltmann

    67

    The Holy Spirit and the Renewal of All Things: Pneumatology in Paul and Jurgen Moltmann
    The Holy Spirit and the Renewal of All Things: Pneumatology in Paul and Jurgen Moltmann

    This volumes explores the shape pneumatology takes when we develop the theology of the Holy Spirit within an eschatological framework that has a universal scope and an unlimited history. When we do so, we find that pneumatology deriving from questions about what the Spirit does for us needs to give way to pneumatology that derives from questions about how the Spirit can draw us into the saving history of the triune God.

  • From the Margins: A Celebration of the Theological Work of Donald W. Dayton

    75

    From the Margins: A Celebration of the Theological Work of Donald W. Dayton
    From the Margins: A Celebration of the Theological Work of Donald W. Dayton

    Recognized as a leading interpreter of major movements in American Christianity such as Evangelicalism, Pentecostalism, and the Holiness movement, Donald W. Dayton has produced a body of work spanning four decades and diverse areas of inquiry. In From the Margins, friends and colleagues respond to major essays by Dayton (several published here for the first time) so as to celebrate and reflect on this diverse and rich body of work. The essays highlight the breadth of Dayton's contribution while also revealing a methodological core. The latter could be described as Dayton's deconstructive reading of standard scholarly narratives in order to short-circuit their domesticating effects on the more radical aspects of American Christianity. Dayton's work has challenged long-held assumptions about the "conservative" nature of American Christianity by showing that both in their history and in their deeper theological substructures, traditions such as Evangelicalism and Pentecostalism are far more radical and productive of social change than was previously imagined.

  • Martin Luther and Buddhism: Aesthetics of Suffering, Second Edition

    80

    Martin Luther and Buddhism: Aesthetics of Suffering, Second Edition
    Martin Luther and Buddhism: Aesthetics of Suffering, Second Edition

    Martin Luther and Buddhism: Aesthetics of Suffering carefully traces the historical and theological context of Luther's breakthrough in terms of articulating justification and justice in connection to the Word of God and divine suffering. Chung critically and constructively engages in dialogue with Luther and with later interpreters of Luther such as Barth and Moltmann, placing the Reformer in dialogue not only with Asian spirituality and religions but also with emerging global theology of religions.

  • Polemic in the Book of Hebrews: Anti-Judaism, Anti-Semitism, Supersessionism?

    64

    Polemic in the Book of Hebrews: Anti-Judaism, Anti-Semitism, Supersessionism?
    Polemic in the Book of Hebrews: Anti-Judaism, Anti-Semitism, Supersessionism?

    "The author of Hebrews is arguing that God himself has brought about the fulfillment of these institutions through his Son's priesthood, his once-for-all sacrifice, and the new covenant he inaugurated in the last days. These new institutions are never denied the Jews. In fact, the context of the epistle presumes that these are primarily for the Jews, considering that the author was speaking to a Jewish-Christian community. The author is not arguing for the abandonment by God of the Jewish people, but rather for the abandonment of the shadowy means by which God's people drew near to him. It is here we can speak of a qualified supersessionism. According to the author of Hebrews, the Levitical priesthood, the Mosaic covenant, and the Levitical sacrifices have been superseded by Jesus' priesthood, the new covenant, and Jesus' once-for-all sacrifice. "However, we conclude that the polemical passages in Hebrews do not promote hatred of the Jews, nor do they advocate the destruction of the Jewish people. Rather, the author of Hebrews stresses the fulfillment of specific Jewish institutions for the benefit of the Jews. It is this idea of fulfillment that rules out the charge that the epistle promotes the supercession of the Jewish people. Because of God's great love for his people, he has provided a superior way by which his people can draw near to him." --from the Conclusion

  • Practices, Politics, and Performance: Toward a Communal Hermeneutic for Christian Ethics

    57

    Practices, Politics, and Performance: Toward a Communal Hermeneutic for Christian Ethics
    Practices, Politics, and Performance: Toward a Communal Hermeneutic for Christian Ethics

    Drawing on the hermeneutical reflections of John Howard Yoder, Stanley Hauerwas, and Mikhail Bakhtin, Cartwright challenges the way twentieth-century American Protestants have engaged the "problem" of the use of scripture in Christian ethics, and issues a summons for a new debate oriented by a communal approach to hermeneutics. By analyzing particular ecclesial practices that stand within living traditions of Christianity, the "politics" of scriptural interpretation can be identified along with the criteria for what a "good performance" of scripture should be. This approach to the use of scripture in Christian ethics is displayed in historical discussions of two Christian practices through which scripture is read ecclesiologically: the Eastern Orthodox liturgical celebration of the Eucharist and the Anabaptist practice of "binding and loosing" or "the rule of Christ." When American Protestants consider "performances" of scripture such as these alongside one another within more ecumenical contexts, they begin to confront the ecclesiological problem with their attempts to "use" the Bible in Christian ethics: the relative absence of constitutive ecclesial practices in American Protestant congregations that can provide moral orientation for their interpretations of Christian scripture.

  • Renewing Tradition: Studies in Texts and Contexts in Honor of James W. Thompson

    65

    Renewing Tradition: Studies in Texts and Contexts in Honor of James W. Thompson
    Renewing Tradition: Studies in Texts and Contexts in Honor of James W. Thompson

    "We offer this collection as a token of our affection and admiration of our friend and colleague James Weldon Thompson. . . . His studies of the letter to the Hebrews and of Paul in their intellectual contexts (especially Middle Platonism) have contributed significantly to the ongoing quest for placing the New Testament in its socio-intellectual setting. Although his publications in this area date back more than thirty years, his best work is occurring now, and we may anticipate path-breaking contributions ahead. His more recent work on preaching and pastoral care in Paul both situate the Apostle in his own world and, just as importantly, offer correctives of some contemporary ministerial practices and invitations for improvements. Since 1993 Thompson has served as the editor of Restoration Quarterly, a significant venue for research in biblical studies, church history (especially of the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement), and contemporary theology. His more popular works make available to a lay audience thoughtful, well-informed, and spiritually rewarding interpretations of much of the New Testament. "His achievements, however, do not end at the printing press. For more than thirty years, he has taught ministers and others at the Institute for Christian Studies (now Austin Graduate School of Theology) and Abilene Christian University. Students of the past and the present speak of him as a prepared, stimulating, and creative teacher unafraid of experimentation for a new generation of learners. At both institutions he also served as an administrator, first as President of ICS and then as Associate Dean of ACU's Graduate School of Theology. His colleagues respect his ability to enlist them for work as needed and otherwise to get out of their way, certainly a too rare set of skills in university administrators!" --from the Preface

  • Colonial Presbyterianism: Old Faith in a New Land

    71

    Colonial Presbyterianism: Old Faith in a New Land
    Colonial Presbyterianism: Old Faith in a New Land

    Colonial Presbyterianism is a collection of essays that tell the story of the Presbyterian Church during its formative years in America. The book brings together research from a broad group of scholars into an accessible format for laymen, clergy, and scholars. Through a survey of important personalities and events, the contributors offer a compelling narrative that will be of interest to Presbyterians and all persons interested in colonial America's religious experience. The clergy described in these essays made a lasting impact on their generation both within the church and in the emerging ethos of a new nation. The ecclesiastical issues that surfaced during this period have tended to be the perennial issues with which Presbyterians have been concerned ever since that time. Now at the three-hundredth anniversary of Presbyterian organization in America, Colonial Presbyterianism is a timely reengagement with the old faith for a new day.

  • Basic Human Rights and the Humanitarian Crises in Sub-Saharan Africa: Ethical Reflections

    74

    Basic Human Rights and the Humanitarian Crises in Sub-Saharan Africa: Ethical Reflections
    Basic Human Rights and the Humanitarian Crises in Sub-Saharan Africa: Ethical Reflections

    For decades, post-independence Africa has been marked by conflicts, violence, and civil wars leading to a displacement of civilian populations and numerous humanitarian crises. For example, the Somali war, the 1994 Rwandan genocide, and the Darfur conflict in Western Sudan illustrate this phenomenon. In these situations, protecting the basic human rights of security, subsistence, the liberties of social participation, and the physical movement of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs)--particularly women, children, and young people--has been seen as inadequate. This book offers the following: a systematic presentation of the nature and scope of the crises; an evaluative description of the achievements and failures of governments, organizations, and the international community in responding to the crises; a critical analysis of the rationale for such an inadequate response; and a philosophical and theological study of basic human rights that seeks to redress these failures by envisioning an appropriate response and a lasting solution to the conflicts, displacement, and humanitarian crises in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  • Leaning Into the Future: The Kingdom of God in the Theology of Jürgen Moltmann and the Book of Revelation

    117

    Leaning Into the Future: The Kingdom of God in the Theology of Jürgen Moltmann and the Book of Revelation
    Leaning Into the Future: The Kingdom of God in the Theology of Jürgen Moltmann and the Book of Revelation

    Leaning into the Future seeks to explore what it may mean to believe in the "Kingship" of God and wait for his "Kingdom" by considering the fundamental role the Kingdom of God plays in the theology of Jurgen Moltmann and in the book of Revelation. Part one is devoted to how Moltmann understands "The Kingdom of God" as the fundamental symbol of hope for humanity, and how he sees the presence of God's reign and kingdom in history as hidden and paradoxical. Part two turns to the way the Book of Revelation uses royal and other political language in its portrait of the future and God's presence in history. In this second part, the book also seeks to explore how Moltmann and the Apocalypse may mutually inform each other, how Moltmann may help us read this biblical book today, and how it in turn may overcome some of the weaknesses in Moltmann's proposal.

  • A Place Somewhat Apart: The Private Worlds of a Late Nineteenth-Century Public University

    63

    A Place Somewhat Apart: The Private Worlds of a Late Nineteenth-Century Public University
    A Place Somewhat Apart: The Private Worlds of a Late Nineteenth-Century Public University

    The story of secularization and religious disestablishment in American higher education is told from the standpoint of a lively community of professors, students, and administrators at the University of Michigan in the late nineteenth century. This campus culture--one of the most closely watched of its day--sheds new light on the personal and cultural meanings of these momentous changes in American intellectual and public life. Here we see how religion was not so much displaced or marginalized in the heyday of university reform as translated into new arenas of public service and scholarly pursuit. The main characters in this story--professors Calvin Thomas and Henry Carter Adams--underwent profound religious crises of faith accompanied by major adjustments in their interpersonal relationships. Together, with students and administrators, their lives constituted a communal biography of religious deconversion. A close examination of these private and public worlds provides a more complete understanding of the dynamics behind new academic policies and intellectual innovations in a leading public university. The non-cognitive, intersubjective, gendered, quasi-religious shadings of academic modernism and early pragmatist philosophy, in particular, come to light in vivid ways. As John Dewey later observed, Michigan became an experimental laboratory for "new meanings to unfold, new acts to propose."

  • Asian Contextual Theology for the Third Millennium: Theology of Minjung in Fourth-Eye Formation

    70

    Asian Contextual Theology for the Third Millennium: Theology of Minjung in Fourth-Eye Formation
    Asian Contextual Theology for the Third Millennium: Theology of Minjung in Fourth-Eye Formation

    In this volume, an attempt is undertaken to highlight the genesis, progress, and transformation of Asian contextual theology of minjung, introducing its historical point of departure, its development, and its transformation in light of younger Korean and Korean American scholars' endeavors. In this regard, the new Asian contextual theology, which is emerging, strives to integrate both minjung and the wisdom of World Religions into its own framework and direction, assuming the character of a public theology and remaining humble and open before God's mystery while featuring its association with minjung in a holistic way.

  • Schleiermacher's Preaching, Dogmatics, and Biblical Criticism: The Interpretation of Jesus Christ in the Gospel of John

    68

    Schleiermacher's Preaching, Dogmatics, and Biblical Criticism: The Interpretation of Jesus Christ in the Gospel of John
    Schleiermacher's Preaching, Dogmatics, and Biblical Criticism: The Interpretation of Jesus Christ in the Gospel of John

    Friedrich Schleiermacher, the "father of modern theology," found his voice first in preaching. This book demonstrates how Schleiermacher moved between the critical reading of Scripture, the proclamation of Christian faith to congregations over a forty-five-year period, and, eventually, the work of theology in all its disciplines. Schleiermacher's Preaching, Dogmatics, and Biblical Criticism is the first work to fully unveil this interaction by focusing on Schleiermacher's 228 known sermons on the Gospel of John. Kelsey shows in detail 1) how the central insights of his theology emerged first in his preaching, and 2) that his dogmatic writings provided a context within which these insights could be related to all the major doctrinal themes of Christian faith. The study concludes by drawing implications for theological reflection and its relation to worship life in our own time.

  • The Sacred Text: Biblical Authority in Nineteenth-Century America

    73

    The Sacred Text: Biblical Authority in Nineteenth-Century America
    The Sacred Text: Biblical Authority in Nineteenth-Century America

    The advances of geologic science, Darwinism, theological liberalism, and higher textual criticism converged in the nineteenth century to present an imposing challenge to biblical authority. The meteoric rise in secular knowledge exerted tremendous pressure on the Protestant theological elite of the time. Their ruminations, conversations, quarrels, and convictions offer penetrating insight into their world--into their perspective on Scripture and authority and how their outlook was challenged, defended, and sometimes changed across time. Moreover, the nineteenth-century imbroglios greatly illuminate a recent controversy over biblical authority. Some influential modern scholars of American religion contend that the doctrine of the inerrancy of the original autographs is a recently contrived theory, a theological aberration decidedly out of concert with mainline orthodoxy since the Reformation. They argue that pressure from biblical critics incited late nineteenth-century Princeton theologians to fabricate the notion as a way to quell criticism against Scripture. American fundamentalists, they insist, unwittingly adopted inerrancy as orthodoxy, being deceived by this innovation. This story has become standard scholarly currency in many quarters. However, The Sacred Text indicates that fundamentalists and conservative Protestants more generally are the standard-bearers of the ascendant theory of biblical authority commonly endorsed among many of the leading Protestant elite in nineteenth-century America.

  • Faith, Theology, and Psychoanalysis: The Life and Thought of Harry S. Guntrip

    72

    Faith, Theology, and Psychoanalysis: The Life and Thought of Harry S. Guntrip
    Faith, Theology, and Psychoanalysis: The Life and Thought of Harry S. Guntrip

    Harry S. Guntrip was best known for his affiliation with two famous psychoanalysts from what is known as the British Independent tradition of psychoanalysis in England: Ronald Fairbairn and Donald Winnicott. This book traces the various influences on the development of his clinical and theological thinking in context of the historical tension between religion and psychoanalysis. The central feature of his development will be demonstrated as a series of polarities, both theoretical and personal, conflicts with which he wrestled theologically, psychologically, and interpersonally on the professional level and in his own personal psychoanalyses. A critical evaluation of the outcome of Guntrip's own personal psychoanalyses with Fairbairn and Winnicott will demonstrate the autobiographical nature of his theoretical analysis of schizoid phenomena: a psychological state of self-preoccupation and way of being in the world. --from the Introduction

  • The Neo-Orthodox Theology of W. W. Bryden

    56

    The Neo-Orthodox Theology of W. W. Bryden
    The Neo-Orthodox Theology of W. W. Bryden

    A biographical study on the Theology of W. W. Bryden.

  • Theology of Anticipation: A Constructive Study of C. S. Peirce

    66

    Theology of Anticipation: A Constructive Study of C. S. Peirce
    Theology of Anticipation: A Constructive Study of C. S. Peirce

    Is hope an attitude of wishful thinking or is it a volitional appropriation of what is to come? What does it mean to believe in a divine promise, anticipating but not experiencing its fulfillment? Theology of Anticipation responds to these questions with a constructive study of C. S. Peirce's philosophy. It explores Peirce's strong but ambiguous links to the tradition of 19th century classical German philosophy and the unique way he resurrected this tradition's theoretical content in the American context. Then introducing Wolfhart Pannenberg's philosophical theology of anticipation in a discussion of Peirce's epistemological application of the theory of abduction, Anette Ejsing reads these two in light of each other, with the goal of proposing a Peircean theology of anticipation. With this proposal, she offers a new model for how both rational inquirers and believing theologians can take for real in the present what belongs permanently to the future. This model describes the human pursuit of cognitive as well as personal fulfillment (of understanding and meaning) as anchored in a promise of fulfillment, which makes it an expression of anticipatory hope. Considering Peirce's religious writings of systematic importance for his philosophy, Theology of Anticipation offers critical comments to two existing interpretations of Peirce's philosophy of religion: Michael L. Raposa's theosemiotic and Robert S. Corrington's Peircean theology of divine potentialities.

  • Coram Deo: Human Life in the Vision of God

    58

    Coram Deo: Human Life in the Vision of God
    Coram Deo: Human Life in the Vision of God

    "In order to adequately address the issues of atonement and christology, we must understand how it is that we think about the relationship between God and the human being. The way in which we understand and interpret the life and death of Jesus and his role within that relationship then impacts our theology of the sacraments, particularly the eucharist. "Further, the questions continue to confront and be confronted by my inescapable identity as a Lutheran Christian. I use the term 'inescapable' because I find myself working from and with theologies and theologians that are unabashedly critical of patriarchal religious doctrine and paternal theological construction, yet I cannot be convinced that the tradition which formed me is irretrievable or irrelevant. . . . "I am seeking to use Luther as one of my sources, but I am working to reinterpret him and offer a more adequate constructive alternative that embodies what is useable in his tradition. I find the potential for a liberating message within Christian theology, and I find a critical theological resource in Luther." --from the Introduction

  • Who Needs a New Covenant?: Rhetorical Function of the Covenant Motif in the Argument of Hebrews

    85

    Who Needs a New Covenant?: Rhetorical Function of the Covenant Motif in the Argument of Hebrews
    Who Needs a New Covenant?: Rhetorical Function of the Covenant Motif in the Argument of Hebrews

    Although covenant is a major theme in Hebrews, Morrison contends all mention of covenant can be deleted without damaging the coherence of the epistle or its christological conclusions. What role, then, does the covenant motif have in the epistle? The arguments in Hebrews are aimed at a Jewish audience--they ignore the needs and religious options relevant to Gentiles. For the readers, the Sinai covenant was the only relevant conceptual competitor to Christ. First-century Jews looked to the Abrahamic and Mosaic covenants as the basis of their obligations to God and God's promises toward them. Although most Jewish writers merged these covenants as if they were one, the author of Hebrews does not--he retains the Abrahamic promises while arguing that the Mosaic covenant is obsolete. The covenant concept supports the exhortations of Hebrews in two ways: 1) it provides the link between priesthood, worship rituals, and other laws, and 2) it enables the author to argue for allegiance to the community as allegiance to Christ.

  • "Education Has Nothing to Do with Theology": James Michael Lee's Social Science Religious Instruction

    61

    "Education Has Nothing to Do with Theology": James Michael Lee's Social Science Religious Instruction
    "Education Has Nothing to Do with Theology": James Michael Lee's Social Science Religious Instruction

    Does education have any relation to theology? How do the educator's worldview commitments speak to his or her practice of education? James Michael Lee brought a definite answer to these questions--a firm no to the relations question, and an advocacy for empirical findings over and against any speculative or theoretical positions in reply to the commitments question. Lee claimed to have a universal, neutral metatheory for all religious education, a theory that would apply to all religious educators in any and every religion. But in proposing his theory he overlooked the way that empirical facts express worldviews. This book is a detective story, tracing commitments that lay underneath empirical "neutrality." In the process the reader will see avenues that unmistakably link education to theology. Education turns out to be a thoroughly worldview-conditioned process. This new work is essential reading for professors and students in both religious and general education.

  • Constructing a Relational Cosmology

    62

    Constructing a Relational Cosmology
    Constructing a Relational Cosmology

    This collection of five essays is both a dialogical engagement with and critical assessment of Nancy R. Howell's book Constructing a Relational Cosmology. The collection includes three essays written from a Whiteheadian process perspective (by Marit A. Trelstad, Kathlyn A. Breazeale, and Marjorie Hewitt Suchocki), one from the perspective of narrative theology (Lisa Stenmark), and one from the Soto Zen Buddhist perspective (Stephanie Kaza). Howell, responding as a Whiteheadian feminist philosopher of religion, takes the critiques and suggestions of her dialogical partners with the utmost seriousness as her foundation for suggesting new directions for ecofeminist thought--an example of what Whiteheadians call "the process of creative transformation."

  • Geoffrey Fisher: Archbishop of Canterbury, 1945-1961

    77

    Geoffrey Fisher: Archbishop of Canterbury, 1945-1961
    Geoffrey Fisher: Archbishop of Canterbury, 1945-1961

    A major figure in twentieth-century Christianity, Geoffrey Fisher worked to modernize the Church of England and to develop the worldwide Anglican Communion. His historic meeting with Pope John XXIII, his participation in national debates on the Suez Crisis and nuclear weapons, and his role in crowning Queen Elizabeth II made him a well-known figure in postwar Britain. His neglect by professional historians is partly remedied by this new biography, the first scholarly account of Fisher's life and career.

  • Reading from the Underside of Selfhood: Bonhoeffer and Spiritual Formation

    95

    Reading from the Underside of Selfhood: Bonhoeffer and Spiritual Formation
    Reading from the Underside of Selfhood: Bonhoeffer and Spiritual Formation

    Dietrich Bonhoeffer's example of self-sacrificing discipleship has for over fifty years inspired Christians around the world in both their resistance to evil and their devotion to Jesus Christ. Yet for some readers--particularly those who suffer trauma, abuse, and other forms of violence--Bonhoeffer's insistence on self-sacrifice, on becoming a "person for others," may prove more harmful than liberating. For those already socialized into self-abnegation, uncritical applications of Bonhoeffer's teachings may reinforce submission, rather than resistance, to evil. This study explores Bonhoeffer's understandings of selfhood and spiritual formation, both in his own experience and writings and in light of the role of gender in psycho-spiritual development. The central constructive chapter creates a mediated conversation between Bonhoeffer and these feminist psychologists on the spiritual formation of survivors of trauma and abuse, including not only dimensions of his thinking to be critiqued from this perspective but also important resources he contributes toward a truly liberating Christian spirituality for those on the underside of selfhood. The book concludes with suggestions regarding the broader relevance of this study and implications for ministry. The insights for spiritual formation developed here provide powerful proof of Bonhoeffer's continuing and concretely contextualized relevance for readers across the full spectrum of human selfhood.

  • Lo, I Tell You a Mystery: Cross, Resurrection, and Paraenesis in the Rhetoric of 1 Corinthians

    54

    Lo, I Tell You a Mystery: Cross, Resurrection, and Paraenesis in the Rhetoric of 1 Corinthians
    Lo, I Tell You a Mystery: Cross, Resurrection, and Paraenesis in the Rhetoric of 1 Corinthians